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Whitehaven Hotel History - Punch

Here is our recipe for iced rum punch. Weary travelers in the "River of Rogues", an account of 18th century life by A.R. Beverly Giddings,, stop at the Whitehaven Hotel to sip iced rum punch beneath a tulip tree:

1 lb brown sugar
1 quart lemon juice
1 quart of pineapple juice
2 quarts rum
1 quart cognac
1/2 cup peach brandy

Mix one pound packed brown sugar in a pan with enough water to dissolve the sugar. Boil 5 minutes. Squeeze the juice from 9 lemons and pour into the hot syrup. Add the lemon rinds. Cool the syrup and chill overnight so that the flavors blend. Just before you serve the punch, remove the rinds. Mix in 1 quart of pineapple juice, 2 quarts of Dark Rum, 1 quart of Cognac and 1/2 cup of peach brandy. Mix well. Pack a large punch bowl with crushed ice and then pour the punch over the ice and serve. Allow mixture to mellow for several hours, occasionally stir and taste. Serves 25.

The passage reads as follows:
We came, MacPherson and I, to the Wicomico River about three of the clock of the following afternoon. The August day was blazing hot; there was no breeze and the water lay quiet and oily against the shore. The horses, though they had drawn my light, closed chaise, were so done in that I thought it best to have them put up at White Haven for the night rather than have them returned to Princess Anne as originally intended. So they and the coachman, Julius, crossed the river with us on the ferry and put up at White Haven at a quite good inn.

There being time before the probable arrival of the steamboat for at least a bath, the lawyer and I took a room there and soon had laved away the grime and perspirations of our journey. To add to our comfort, our good host made us an iced rum punch, which we drank while seated under a giant tulip tree at the rear of the inn. An hour later, the Maryland came hissing, panting and clanking up to the wharf, and presently a crier came through the streets announcing the arrival and that she would take passengers for Vienna, Cambridge, Easton Point, Annapolis and Baltimore . . .


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